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Snipping Urls, Tweets for Twitter,
ocean.flynn.

Knitting Flickr http://snurl.com/27qa1-3958 , Twitter, http://snurl.com/27qg6-3958 wordpress http://snurl.com/27q03-3958 using snurls

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SnipURL or Snurl or Snipr (all the same domain) can snip urls to shorten them from super long (eg 500 characters +) to 18, 20, 26 characters. These snurls can be used in emails, in microblogs such as Twitter, etc. Snurls don’t wrap. They remain “meaningful so you can remember and share them in the future, and permanent so if your underlying URL expires or changes you can always modify your snipped URL. (As a bonus, you can even see the popularity of you URLs by viewing how many people clicked on it).”


The name “film industry” no longer describes what is currently being done in Canada in the name of moving pictures (with or without sound) and should be canned. Not the industry, just the name.

For my recent birthday I received a gift of the Cosco movie package. It was better than a dozen roses! My birthday fell on a week night so we had to go to whatever movie was showing after 9:30 pm in Calgary’s ciniplexes. Thanks to Rotten Tomatoes and the excellent advice of someone we love we chose the perfect film for us, one we wouldn’t have chosen if we hadn’t been able to check reviews and even see clips together beforehand on-line. But what made this experience so unique, surreal, magical, romantic and totally unexpected was the empty theatre. When we realized we were going to be alone we did what we have never dared to before . . . we spread coats, belongings, refreshments over a half a dozen seats or more. We put up our feet on the seats in front of us and sprawled over seats beside us and we talked and laughed out loud during the whole movie. [digg=http://digg.com/url_to/story_on_digg]

When we finally got up to leave we realized there was one other couple nowhere near out seats. In the entire complex there seemed to only be 3 or 4 couples!

Last evening I watched Amnesia on a public library rental DVD. But quite often I just open my Quick Time Player and watch a dozen of our home made .avi clips at random, most of them shaky and murderously boring for “anyone who hadn’t been there.” Even 60 seconds of our (almost invariably poor quality) images with the sounds of wind blowing through cedars or a grain field, rain drops falling on a secluded lake in a BC provincial park, rushing spring waterfalls roaring below us as we leaned over a trestle might seem like an eternity for anyone else but us. For us those 60 seconds bring us back to an exact time and place with an added intensity that photos alone might not.

The video room at the National Gallery of Canada was one of the most people-free spaces in a huge building of people-free spaces. For high-intensity user like myself this was fine. I would take the time that so much contemporary video and interactive multimedia required. It was discouraging when the technology failed to work, as it often did, example …. installation piece entitled . It made me wonder how often the hype surrounding a particular very-well funded visual artist with enormous cultural capital and his/her work had given a life to something that may not have ever existed in the embodied world at all except in exclusive art journals and the fertile mind of the artist. (I am not referring to Conceptual Art which is clearly framed as art that exists first and primarily as concept). I was enthralled when some new technology was subverted into a totally unintended way to create brilliant works by a bricoleur/bricoleuse.

It was in these dark solitary rooms of the contemporary video section, some like Stan Douglas’ hauntingly beautiful, and culturally important travail de memoire (Spanish, British, First Nations) – Nutka series and others as small as a garden shed, (Did Wong do the cinammon on a stove element?) that some of the most memorable gallery moments occurred for me. There was one I was trying to put into words the other day that had left me breathless. It was filmed by someone with a handheld camera who simply ran after an empty paper chip bag as he was carried by gusts of wind. The primary sound that we could hear was the artist’s breathing which seemed to get louder as he got out of breath. He followed the chip bag and let the camera rest on it for long pauses between wind gusts. When the bag was picked up by the breeze and carried off over the waters the video obviously ended and there was a moment of silence that was ridiculously poignant. Which Vancouver-based video artist did that amazing loop film Paradise Island of the coconut falling then floating for infinity? Who did the one that focused on her father’s hand gestures as he spoke, not on his face and then let the camera reveal that his gestures had been inherited by her and were as clearly an indicator of their family ties as DNA? Whenever I could I would draw attention to these works to others, sometimes in a more formal role as contract art educator but even more often in conversation with others even years later . . .

Unfortunately to get to those gems I lost literally hours (of precious time I can never get back) of painfully long videos about which much ink had been spilt and that had obviously made it through the careful scrutiny of teams of experts at local, regional, national and international levels including juries of their peers and film curators at the top of their profession. Perhaps if I saw them again today with a remote control in my hand so I could fast forward, rewind, eliminate sections, turn off the sound in a large comfortable ciniplex eating buttered popcorn . . . Maybe not. But I would really love to see the paper chip bag again even if someone else did a derivative of the original . . Perhaps on Youtube or Google video?

Everyone that matters in the Canadian film industy is together in Banff preparing a portrait of what is being done in the name of the film industry.

Adina Lebo, Executive Director of ShowCanada wrote in her news release, entitled “Rollin’ in the Rockies” that the cinema of the future will be based in digital projection technology (Lebo 2008-04 filmjournal.com).

Robert Cuffley who is director of Walk All Over Me in Calgary claimed in an interview with Calgary Herald journalist Stephen Hunt that “digital film-making is changing the way movies look, and the way in which they need to be made. [It will also] put the medium into the hands of more creative people. Technological change has put more inexpensive technology in the hands of those who, 10 years ago, couldn’t dream of being able to afford to make a film. That’s no longer an excuse. [. . .] I always cite a film like Celebration, the Danish film that was so good. I think it was shot on a $1,200 camcorder (Cuffley in Hunt 2008-04-30 CH C:1,5). ”

Adina Lebo, Executive Director of the Motion Picture Theatre Association of Canada, predicted that multiplexes as we know them will gradually be replaced with a variety of cultural productions with limitless possibilities. The Motion Picture Theatre Association of Canada are hosting ShowCanada, the 22nd annual film industry of Canada’s convention currently taking place at the Banff Springs Hotel (Lebo in Hunt 2008-04-30 CH C:1,5). [This event and themes surrounding it are astonishingly not Search Engine Optimized].

Lebo argued that the future “film-less” society however will not elimate movies for those movie-lovers who have grown up with movies. The majority of what will be projected in the ciniplex-entertainment centre of the future, will be on huge digital screens. Eventually audiences won’t be watching projections of fragile physical film in cans. The shift to digital screens albeit very costly items is already well under way in Canada with 5000 digital screens installed aa of spring 2008 and a predicted increase in their use to 150% in 2009 (Lebo in Hunt 2008-04-30 CH C:1,5).

There will always be purists who prefer film and vinyl for their sight and sound enjoyment. They will be like the slow food, slow world protagonists, who maintain archives of productions from the pre-digital era.

This afternoon I will hang out my laundry on a clothes line and then I will get my gloved hands deep in dirt again, digging holes, trimming back, sawing branches, playing with white stones, buckets and planters and at the end of the day it will still look like a 1950s house with not much changed in 60 years. The flax bread in the breadmaker beeped at me awhile ago. I will probably bake something from Fanny Farmer before they arrive. That’s the really slow world. But I’m ready for Stan Douglas at Calgary’s future digital multiplexes . . .

Webliography and Bibliography

Douglas, Stan. 1996. “Nut-ka”. National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, ON.

Hunt, Stephen. 2008. “Cinema Variety: Will Digital Technology Change the Way You Think about Yout Local Multiplex?” Calgary Herald. 2008-04-30. C:1, 5. url svp anyone?

Lebo, Adina. 2008. Rollin’ in the Rockies.” Film Journal online. http://snurl.com/26i1s [www_filmjournal_com]

Watson, Scott. 1998. Stan Douglas. London, UK: Phaidon Press.

CC 3.0 Flynn-Burhoe, Maureen. 2008. “Made in Canada: The Art of Moving Pictures in the Age of Digital Reproduction.” Speechless. 2008-04-30. https://oceanflynn.wordpress.com/2008/04/30/made-in-canada http://snurl.com/26ixa


Dendrons, Pisces and the CosmosThis layered image 1440 x 900 at 300 dpi is one stage of the development of my next digitage entitled "Digitage Web2.0 Plus." It is an update on Logo Digitage ( http://snurl.com/25nqe ) in my Flickr album that was the basis for slideshare.net .ppt called Deconstructing Digitage: Web 2.0 as Organic Rhizomic Synapses which has had 1859 views since first uploading 8 months ago.

A comment from slideshare.net cofounder Amit Ranjanon ( http://snurl.com/266mt ) on the .ppt about the low resolution along with the need for .ppt default sizes for to increase shareability, led me to revisit the original .psd file and the .jpg components.

Each layer is being revisited and updated as I learn more about Adobe Photoshop tools and more about each of the component metaphorical images embedded in the many layers. At the same time I am learning more about the organic growth of Web 2.0 Plus (also called Web 3.0, etc). Aggregators and microblogging technologies like twitter http://snurl.com/25t6 have enhanced and simplified connectivity while confusing virtual cartographic projects to visualize the blogosphere as it grows exponentially. I learn from others and also by playing with new technological tools. I remain a bricoleuse, better able to find things in the virtual thrift stores that might come in handy one day. I don’t like to learn by following anymore than the basic instructions and the need-to-know-how things for reasons of security or time-efficiency.

This entry is posted on speechless.

Folksonomy for Flickr

View ocean.flynn’s map
Taken in a place with no name (See more photos or videos here)
This layered image 1440 x 900 at 300 dpi is one stage of the development of my next digitage entitled “Digitage Web2.0 Plus.” It is an update on Logo Digitage ( snurl.com/25nqe ) in my Flickr album that was the basis for slideshare.net .ppt called Deconstructing Digitage: Web 2.0 as Organic Rhizomic Synapses which has had 1859 views since first uploading 8 months ago.

A comment from slideshare.net cofounder Amit Ranjanon ( snurl.com/266mt ) on the .ppt about the low resolution along with the need for .ppt default sizes for to increase shareability, led me to revisit the original .psd file and the .jpg components.

Each layer is being revisited and updated as I learn more about Adobe Photoshop tools and more about each of the component metaphorical images embedded in the many layers. At the same time I am learning more about the organic growth of Web 2.0 Plus (also called Web 3.0, etc). Aggregators and microblogging technologies like twitter snurl.com/25t6 have enhanced and simplified connectivity while confusing virtual cartographic projects to visualize the blogosphere as it grows exponentially. I learn from others and also by playing with new technological tools. I remain a bricoleuse, better able to find things in the virtual thrift stores that might come in handy one day. I don’t like to learn by following anymore than the basic instructions and the need-to-know-how things for reasons of security or time-efficiency.

Flickr groups to which this image belongs: Art & Theory Nobs (Pool), Folksonomy (Pool); Digg It Flickr. Pool (Pool) [X]

Flickr folksonomy: folksonomy, flickr, digitage, creation, creativecommons, connectivity, blogging, adobephotoshop, 1440×900, microblogging, mindbrain, mind, neuralarchitectonics, neuroscience, portrait, powerpoint, powerpointbackground, presentation, raptureofthedeepinternet, reflexivity, rhizome, sharingpresentations, selfportrait, slides, slideshare, synapses, synapticgasp, tagclouds, tagging, taxonomy, technology, theoryinpictures, twitter, vastation, visualization, visualizations, web20, wordpresscom,


300Slow World Background 1440 x 900 res: 300One bud is slowly opening into an apple blossom on a cut branch in a large blue glass vase. I had clipped them in March so I could insert the fast-foward spring green into the acrylic painting I am working on in my living room.

View ocean.flynn's profile on slideshare

The urgent need to nurture the slow world is heightened after reading the NYT article on the health risk to bloggers who race against time.


The strong Coulomb force or intermolecular attraction between water molecules in water drops due to the polarity of hydrogen’s tetrahedral configuration, is an excellent example of cohesion between like molecules. When refering to unlike molecules the term is adhesion.

Thank you wiki for the info and Melanie for the rose.

“Image of the layer on the term “cohesion” is from the Visual Thesaurus, Copyright ©1998-2008 Thinkmap, Inc. All rights reserved.” And such attribution, when clicked should also link back to the Site.

The resolution of this PowerPoint slide is set at W:1440 pixels x H:900 pixels which is the slowest speed and highest fidelity that the author can set under the Slide Show settings >> Set Up Show >> Slide Show Resolution. The background image of the PowerPoint program screen was frozen in Adobe Photoshop and saved as a .jpg at a resolution of 300 dpi (pixels per inch), 3.71 M, and a Document size of W12.19 cm x H7.62 cm.

Update:

I was unsure of Visual Thesaurus’ Terms of Use for the visualizations of terms generated by their software, so I filled in their on-line form in some detail. Two hours later I received a phone call from them! When I explained that the image was to be used on my personal blogs including Flickr and WordPress and that they might be incorporated into a presentation at the Association for Baha’i Studies annual conference which is on Social Cohesion, the representative immediately agreed that there was no problem with using it in this way! I was impressed with the rapidity of the response.

Since I am experimenting with free open source material I cannot purchase their user-pay products but I can certainly recommend the minimalist, elegant and functional design of their visualizations and recommend that those who can investigate both MindMap and Visual Thesaurus as technologies.

folksonomy: connectivity, twitter, slideshare, speechless, flickr, PowerPoint, AdobePhotoshop, image:resolution, Creative Commons, design, social cohesion, Visual Thesaurus, mind maps,

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One way of following the microblogging phenomena called Twitter is through http://twittervision.com which is similar to http://flickrvision.com.

Twitter, the winner of the 2007 South by Southwest Web Awards has seen incredible growth since it was first launched in October, 2006. It is another form of lifestreaming. See http://twitter.com/oceanflynn

Twitter, Jaiku and Pownce are open source tools for microblogging, described by Aksay, Song, Finin and Tseng (2007-08-12) as a relatively new form of communication in which users can describe their current status, activities, or interests in short posts (c. 140 to 200 characters) distributed by instant messages, mobile phones, email or the Web. In their workshop paper (2007-08-12) they analyse the topological and geographical properties of Twitter’s social network and the user intentions associated at a community level and show how users with similar intentions connect with each other. They observed that people use microblogging to nurture friendships by sharing their everyday activities and to seek or share information. [Microblog users intentions are “information sharing, information seeking, and friendship-wise relationship.”] (Aksay, Song, Finin and Tseng 2007-08-12).”

Microblogs like Twitters (tweets) are space-efficient, to the point, written in txt-style often indicating relevant links (to articles, blogs, videos, images, podcasts, etc) using tools like http://tinyurl.com[1] which dramatically decreases url length. For example https://oceanflynn.wordpress.com/2008/04/01/microblogging-user-intent-info-sharingseeking-and-friendship-wise-relationship/ becomes http://tinyurl.com/3b8g5k.

Enter a long URL to make tiny:

Twitter users can comment or reply to each other’s posts by using the @ symbol followed by a username in their tweets. For example see http://quotably.com/oceanflynn (@oceanflynn).

“The primary knock against Twitter has been that it is made up primarily of a community of self-interested nerds engaged in navel-gazing (Langton 2008).”

Notes

“Much of research in user intention detection has focused on understanding the intent of a search queries. According to Broder [5], the three main categories of search queries are navigational, informational and transactional. Understanding the intention for a search query is very different from user intention for content creation. In a survey of bloggers, Nardi et al. [26] describe different motivations for “why we blog”.”

Footnotes

1. ReadWriteWeb critiqued tinyurl when a temporary loss of service resulted in tinyurl deadlinks for frustrated users. They promoted snurl.com. While tinyurl is relatively easy to do manually for open source users, snurl seems to require WordPress plug-ins, etc which are available only to paying users on wordpress.org not on wordpress.com.

Webliography

Java, Akshay; Song, Xiaodan; Finin, Tim; Tseng, Belle. 2007. “Why We Twitter: Understanding Microblogging Usage and Communities.” Proceedings of the Joint 9th WEBKDD and 1st SNA-KDD Workshop 2007. August 12.

Langton, Jerry. 2008-03-29. “Forget Facebook, everyone’s a-Twitter.” TheStar.com.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micro-blogging