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Reconfiguring Rivers: Ethics, Human Nature and the Brain

April 29, 2007


 

Everyday life[1] is the space in which social interaction unfolds, memories are produced and sympathies formed. These impact directly on individual and collective evaluations of social justice and on human rights issues. It is a matter of critically engage with useful concepts, to situate pivotal moments in space and time so that we will be able to evaluate situations ─ in the case of human rights to evaluate justice ─ with greater lucidity and reason (Changeux and Ricoeur 2000b).


[1] Everyday life is a dynamic social space, where in meanings are mutually constructed by human actors who are answerable or responsible for actions. This concept of answerability within everyday events, was developed by Bakhtin (1998:181) and summarized by Bender (1971) The working concept of everyday life as “the ground of sociality, culture, and the emotional ground tone of individual interaction” was developed by Lefebvre (1999), and Shields (Thompson 1939).

Bibliography

 

 

Changeux, Jean-Piere and Paul Ricoeur. 2000a. “Origins of Morality: Darwian Evolution and Moral Norms.” Translated by M. B. DeBevoise. Pp. 179- in What Makes Us Think? A Neuroscientist and a Philosopher Argue about Ethics, Human Nature and the Brain. Princeton:University of Princeton Press.

 

Changeux, Jean-Piere and Paul Ricoeur. 2000b. What Makes Us Think? A Neuroscientist and a Philosopher Argue about Ethics, Human Nature and the Brain. Translated by M. B. DeBevoise. Princeton: University of Princeton Press.

 

© 2007 Flynn-Burhoe, Maureen. 2007. “Reconfiguring Rivers: Ethics, Human Nature and the Brain.” > Speechless. April 28. http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=ddp3qxmz_208hp4xp6

 

3 Responses to “Reconfiguring Rivers: Ethics, Human Nature and the Brain”


  1. […] Maureen. 2007.  “Reconfiguring Rivers Ethics Human Nature and the Brain. >> […]

  2. dlende Says:

    I was very intrigued by your definition of the everyday, and hoped to get some more specific references on the texts you cite. I recently summarized Gardner’s take on the Changeux/Ricoeur book over at Neuroanthropology, where I have also written on the everyday through considering Maurice Bloch and Caroline Knapp.

    If it’s easier to email me, please do so at dlende @ nd . edu

    Thanks!
    Daniel

  3. Louise Collins Says:

    Are you related to T.H.Burhoe married to Mary E. Williams Burhoe, missionaries in Burma late 1800s?


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