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  • Microsoft OneNote – $0
  • Google Keep – Google users
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  • Notion: $0 then $4/m+ – Teamwork
  • Org-mode Wikipedia article
  • Turtl
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  • Standard Notes secure, encrypted note taking
  • Evernote Basic (free), Plus ($34.99 per year), and Premium ($69.99 per year).
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  • Quip $12/m
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MSRP Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price or retail price

 


I began to appreciate these technologies while updating some Wikipedia articles of the wildfires in Alberta and then in the Amazon. The excerpts below are based on an March 19 ESA article “COVID-19: nitrogen dioxide over China.”

Some of the content is from the Wikipedia article on the Sentinel-5 Precursor.

The European Space Agency (ESA)’s Earth observation satellite, Sentinel-5 Precursor, which is part of the Copernicus Programme is monitors and reports on air pollution. The Tropomi instrument on the 5P satellite, showed a “dramatic reduction in nitrogen dioxide concentrations” in “all major Chinese cities between late-January and February,” 2020. China had enacted strict measures in late December 2019, and by late January, daily activities in China had ceased following orders by Chinese authorities to close and to clear streets. According to the European Space Agency (ESA) Nitrogen dioxide is released by “power plants, industrial facilities and vehicles.”

Studies, based on Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service’s (CAMS) combination of “satellite observations with detailed computer models of the atmosphere, said that, in February 2002, compared to the three previous years, there was a decrease of about 20 to 30 percent one of the “most important air pollutants”—fine suspended particulate matter (SPM) over large parts of China.”

The March 19 article also said that recent data showed a “decline of air pollution over northern Italy coinciding with its nationwide lockdown to prevent the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19).”

The European_Space_Agency (ESA)’s Earth observation satellite, Sentinel-5 Precursor, which is part of the Copernicus Programme is monitoring and reporting on air pollution.

“The Tropomi instrument on the 5P satellite, showed a “dramatic reduction in nitrogen dioxide concentrations” in “all major Chinese cities between late-January and February,” 2020. China had enacted strict measures in late December 2019, and by late January, daily activities in China had ceased following orders by Chinese authorities to close and to clear streets. According to the European Space Agency (ESA) Nitrogen dioxide is released by “power plants, industrial facilities and vehicles.”

“Studies, based on Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service’s (CAMS) combination of “satellite observations with detailed computer models of the atmosphere, said that, in February 2002, compared to the three previous years, there was a decrease of about 20 to 30 percent one of the “most important air pollutants”—fine suspended particulate matter (SPM) over large parts of China.”

Notes

The “Tropomi (TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument) is a spectrometer sensing ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS), near (NIR) and short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) to monitor ozone, methane, formaldehyde, aerosol, carbon monoxide, NO2 and SO2 in the atmosphere.”


 

Paterson the film

After watching the film Paterson (2016), I learned that the the the esteemed poet Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, and author of the volumes of poems entitled Paterson, William Carlos Williams, was born in 1883 in Rutherford, New Jersey and died there in 1963.

Paterson, the film, documents a week in the life of the main character, a bus driver in the town of Paterson, New Jersey, who is played by Adam Driver, Paterson’s wife, Laura, played by Golshifteh Farahani, and their English bulldog, Marvin. Paterson, is a poet who carries his notebook with him on his bus routes, and on his walks on his way to work, in his neighbourhood, and in the park near the Passiac Falls.  The film brings to life a 2020 version of the embodied Paterson as described by Williams in 1946, a man who is “in himself is a city, beginning, seeking , achieving and concluding his life in ways which the various aspects of a city may embody— if imaginatively conceived — any city, all the details of which may be made to voice his most intimate convictions.”

Paterson the book of poetry

Williams published Paterson in the post-WWII period, between 1946 and 1958. It was described as a “modernist epic collage of place” which recounts the “history, people, and essence of Paterson, New Jersey.” He “wrote his own modern epic poem, focusing on “the local” on a wider scale than he had previously attempted.

In the author’s note to Paterson, Williams wrote, ”

“Paterson is a long poem in four parts — that a man in himself is a city, beginning, seeking , achieving and concluding his life in ways which the various aspects of a city may embody— if imaginatively conceived — any city, all the details of which may be made to voice his most intimate convictions. Part One introduces the elemental character of the place. The Second Part comprises the modern replicas. Three will seek a language to make them vocal, and Four, the river below the falls, will be reminiscent of episodes — all that any one man may achieve in a lifetime.”

Williams also examined the role of the poet in American society and famously summarized his poetic method in the phrase “No ideas but in things” (found in his poem “A Sort of a Song” and repeated again and again in Paterson).”

Let the snake wait under
his weed
and the writing
be of words, slow and quick, sharp
to strike, quiet to wait,
sleepless.
— through metaphor to reconcile
the people and the stones.
Compose. (No ideas
but in things) Invent!
Saxifrage is my flower that splits
the rocks.

James Joyce’s Ulysses

Williams was inspired by James Joyce’s Ulysses. Joyce’s fictional character is Leopold Bloom, who lived at 52 Clanbrassil Street in Portobello, Dublin, Ireland, where there is now a memorial plaque commemorating Bloom.

The James Joyce Museum website describes how Joyce “forensically” documented June 16th, 1904, a day in Bloom’s life. On that exact date, Joyce went on his first date with “the love of his life, Nora Barnacle from Galway”.

The first lines in Ulysses describe the fictional “stately, plump Buck Mulligan” at the top of the Martello tower in  Sandy Cove, Dublin, which is now the Joyce Tower museum. The significance of these lines is explained by the Joyce Project.

“Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came from the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed.”

Play list of music for the film Paterson

The play list for the music in the 2016 includes Soltane Ghalbha, which was composed by Anooshirvan Rohani (b. 1939) for a 1968 Iranian film by the same name, which was directed by Mohammad Ali Fardin. Soltane Ghalbha means King of Hearts. It was played by the Iranian pianist, Mohsen Karbassi. Rohani composed all the music for the 1968 film. and Aref Arefkia and Ahdieh sang the songs that were then dubbed by the lead performers. This is a YouTube video of Arefkia singing Soltane Ghalbha.

Other music is listed on Spotify:

  • Walk through this world with me by Tammy Wynette
  • Trespasser by Bad Medicine
  • I’m still a man (Lord have mercy) by Willie West
  • Blue Lester by Lester Young
  • The Whole Town’s Laughing at me by Teddy Pendergrass
  • Untitled (feat. Scar) (Explicit) by Killer Mike, Scar R.A.P. Music
  • Kieh Kieh Dar Mizanheh by Pouran on Best of Pouran
  • Blue Mode by Reuben Wilson
  • I’m still a man (Lord have mercy) instrumental by Willie West
  • Lonely Town, Lonely Street by Bill Withers

The poet who wrote the poems in Paterson the film

I am enchanted by the film Paterson on Netflix. It is a film about a fictional poet Paterson who lives in Paterson and who is inspired by William Carlos Williams, a poet who wrote a book of poetry called Paterson. Ron Padgett, a poet, wrote 4 poems for the film Paterson. This one is from an exquisite scene between a 11-year old girl who is a poet reading her poem to Paterson when they meet on his way home from his day job as bus driver.

A poem by  Ron Padgett

Water falls from the bright air
It falls like hair
Falling across a young girl’s shoulders
Water falls
Making pools in the asphalt
Dirty mirrors with clouds and buildings inside
It falls on the roof of my house
Falls on my mother and on my hair
Most people call it rain

Notes

  1. Day 1, Hour 1. This post, which has just begun on March 21, will include Creative Commons and open source content including poetry, Wikipedia links, Gutenberg Press content, a Google map called Mapping Fiction on Web 2.0. I am also making a Google Earth map to help for accuracy that will not be publicly available.
  2. This is day 2, Hour 2 of the mapping fiction project. Concurrent to the Google Maps I made for this, I was also working on a Google Earth folder as well. After realizing that Google Maps description fields are not responsive to either Wikipedia code [ https://www.gutenberg.org/files/4300/4300-h/4300-h.htm Ulysses] or html code <a ref=”https://www.gutenberg.org/files/4300/4300-h/4300-h.htm”>Ulysses,</a&gt; I hope to share the Google Earth version. For example, The setting for the first lines in Ulysses is the Martello tower in  Sandy Cove, Dublin, which is now the Joyce Tower museum.
  3. According to Wikipedia, Williams, in “addition to his writing, had a long career as a physician practicing both pediatrics and general medicine. He was affiliated with Passaic General Hospital, where he served as the hospital’s chief of pediatrics from 1924 until his death. The hospital, which is now known as St. Mary’s General Hospital, paid tribute to Williams with a memorial plaque that states, “We walk the wards that Williams walked.”
  4. The Joyce Project was undertaken by John Hunt, who was a then a professor of literature at the University of Montana, who was aided with over a dozen contributors, from the US, Ireland, Canada, and Iran.  I have created an Internet Archives url here.
  5. In 1827, Timothy Botchford Crane (1773 – 1845) ” built the first chasm bridge” across the Passaic River. They were then known as the Passaic River and are now called  the Great Falls.

“So far everything had gone smoothly. The pulley and ropes were securely fastened on each side of the chasm, and everything made in readiness to pull the clumsy bridge into position. It was a wooden structure boarded up on both sides, and a roof. It was about two o’clock in the afternoon and a large crowd had gathered — a large crowd for that time, as the town only numbered about four thou- sand—to watch the bridge placed in position. But the happiest man in the town that day was Timothy B. Crane, who had charge of the bridge. Tim Crane was a hotel keeper and kept a tavern on the Manchester side of the Falls. His place was a great resort for circus men. Such famous circus men of the long ago as Dan Rice and James Cooke, the great bareback rider, visited him. Tim Crane built the bridge because his rival, Fyfield, who kept the tavern on the other side of the falls, was getting the benefit of the “Jacob’s Ladder,” as it was sometimes called — the “hundred steps,” a long, rustic, winding stairs in the gorge leading to the opposite side of the river — it making his, place more easy to get to. . . . Crane was a very robust man over six feet tall. He wore side whiskers. He was well known to the other citizens as a man of much energy and no little ability.”

6. Lyrics to Soltane Ghalbha

The Sultan (King) of the Hearts
A part of my heart tells me to go, to go,
The other part of my heart tells me not to go, not to go,
My heart is not patient, not patient,
What should I do without you,

For the love, o my pretty one, my pretty one,
The world is so small, so small,
Everywhere I go, your memory is with me, your memory is with me,
I won’t leave you alone,

You’re the sultan (king) of my heart, my heart,
You broke through my heart’s gates,
You gave a love promise to my heart,
You joined me,
Now if I’m anywhere but far from you,
I won’t give my heart to anyone as a beloved but you,
I’m filled with wishing and demand,
O my beautiful beloved,

A part of my heart tells me to, go, to go,
The other part of my heart tells me not to go, not to go,
My heart is not patient, not patient,
What should I do without you,

For the love, o my pretty one, my pretty one,
The world is so small, so small,
Everywhere I go, your memory is with me, your memory is with me,
I won’t leave you alone,

You’re the sultan (king) of my heart, my heart,
You broke through my heart’s gates,
You gave a love promise to my heart,
You joined me,

Now if I’m anywhere but far from you,
I won’t give my heart to anyone as a beloved but you,
I’m filled with wishing and demand,
O my beautiful beloved.
https://lyricstranslate.com

References

Joyce, James (1922). Ulysses. London: Egoist Press. 732 pages.

Joyce, James. The Project Gutenberg EBook of Ulysses.
Wikipedia contributors. Paterson (film) Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved March 21, 2020.

Wikipedia contributors. “William Carlos Williams.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved  March 20, 2020.

Wikipedia contributors. “Rutherford, New Jersey.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 6 Mar. 2020. Web. 22 Mar. 2020. March 21, 2020

Williams, William Carlos  (1946-58). Paterson. New York: New Direction. oclc: 1001922820. 248 pages. The first collected edition of all 5 books was published in 1963, preceded by cumulative collected editions of 1949, 1950, and 1951.

Williams, William Carlos  (1946-58). Internet Archives full-text of Paterson.


 

This segment from the summer of 1994, is part of an ongoing life story series, a work in progress. In many ways it relates to how Wikipedia changed my mind.

From 1992 to 1995, while earning my MA in Canadian Studies at Carleton, I presented a draft of my multi media project to my MA supervisor, Marion (Mame) Jackson and John Shepherd in the Bell Canada-funded theatre in the Minto Centre for Advanced Studies in Engineering.

An article entitled “Advancing Education through Communications Technology” was published in the summer of 1994 in Carleton University’s The Charlatan under Carleton University Developments. With the addition of this new Minto theatre Carleton became one of the first universities in Canada to have multi media facilities (1994:3).

In the end, the administration decided that I could not present my MA thesis in a multi media format as a CD-ROM. The CD-ROM multi-media project “Jessie Oonark: Woman in the Centre” was one of many projects submitted as a requirement for my MA, not my thesis itself. My MA was transformed from the more traditional  thesis based masters into a course based program. My final CD-ROM project to complete my MA requirements is described in this 1999 Art Libraries Journal article, “Shape-shifting and other points of convergence: Inuit art and digital technologies“.

In a summer 1994 article entitled “Advancing Education through Communications Technology” in the Carleton University newspaper, The Charlatan, then-Director of Instructional Media Services, Ross Mutton estimated that the interest in using computers was growing rapidly. By the summer of 1994 there were already 30 professors at Carleton who were using computers regularly in their courses. For example, by 1993, Professor Peter Watson was using computers instead of the blackboard and overhead projectors to teach his astronomy classes. In his courses, he had begun to use multimedia technologies to incorporate notes he had entered into his computer with images and demonstrations including star clusters and simulations of how spacecraft moved. In 1992, with the addition of the Bell Canada-funded theatre in the Minto Centre for Advanced Studies in Engineering, Carleton became one of the first universities in Canada to have multi media facilities. The first Bell theatre had “video and data projectors and a teaching console with everything built in, making it as advanced a classroom as you’ll find anywhere” according to Ross.

Excerpt from “Advancing Education through Communications Technology”. Carleton University Developments. The Charlatan. Summer 1994. Page 3.

“Though there is no hard and fast definition of what exactly multi media is, it generally involves the application of different media-video, sound, images, text, and so on-in a single package. Learning to use so many different things can be a big challenge.”

“That’s where the Teaching and Learning Resource Centre comes in. “We have two responsibilities,” says Carole Dence, the Centre’s director.

“One is to get on top of what’s out there and to make people on campus aware of what it can do. The other is to provide support to those who want to get material in shape for their classes.”

The Centre has computing hardware and software which can be used for multi media projects, adn also organizes workshops and presentations.

It’s also providing intensive support to Maureen Flynn-Burhoe, a Master’s student in the School of Canadian Studies, who is one of the first students at Carleton to use multi media for a graduate research project.

“When I first started to do research on Jessie Oonark, an [Inuit] artist who lived from 1906-1985, I found myself wanting to make cross references, to link different drawings together,” Maureen explains. “Rather than a verbal essay, a visual essay made more sense.”

Incorporating drawings, maps, photographs, video, sound and text, her project has taken her far beyond the realm of art history.

“When I needed maps, I worked with the geography department,” she says. “To create a glossary of Inuit terms, I collaborated with the linguistics department. When I needed technical assistance, I got it from the engineering faculty. It’s been wonderful.”

David Coll, an engineering professor who helped Maureen and who uses multi media to teach an introductory course in computer programming, maintains that multi media will, in essence, encourage students to be scholars.

“It provides access to much more information in many different forms,” he points out. “Students have to learn to get all the information there is.”

Multi media is also opening new opportunities for students in the School of Architecture. The school’s director, Ben Gianni, feels that architects have a role to play in this area “because information is being organized visually, rather than verbally.

“We have a sense of how things look, how they fit together. We work in a visual world, so multi media is an excellent opportunity for us to present and organize information in new ways (1994:3).”

References

Flynn-Burhoe, Maureen. 1994. “Shape-shifting and other points of convergence: Inuit art and digital technologies.” Volume 24Issue 3. 1999 , pp. 38-41. https://doi.org/10.1017/S030747220001962 Cambridge University Press. Published online June 6, 2016

“Advancing Education through Communications Technology”. Carleton University Developments. The Charlatan. Summer 1994. Page 3.

Notes

Professor Shepherd was Director of Carleton’s School for Studies in Art and Culture from 1991-1997 and also its founder. (He served as Chair of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology from 1999 to 2000.)


In his May 21, 2018 article, “Right-wing populism is rising as progressive politics fails – is it too late to save democracy?” in The New Statesman, Michael Sandel suggests that we can learn from the populist revolt only if we are willing to enlarge the conversation beyond a liberal concept of economic “fairness”, to cultural, even spiritual or moral, issues of meaning, identity and purpose. Since the 1980s technocratic liberalism remained largely unchallenged, not only as an economic, but also as a political and even cultural phenomenon. The unquestioned central premise that government was the problem markets were the solution, led to an unfettered market-driven version of globalisation that included a “growing financialisation of the economy”. The unintended consequences of the increase in liberal trade agreements at a global level and a deregulated financial industry, included a stark and unrelenting rise in the extremes of wealth and poverty. And with fewer people holding more wealth, their power in governance increased. Sandel challenges the widely accepted view of “meritocracy” which he calls “meritocratic hubris”, where “social positions reflect effort and talent.” This economic and cultural environment has proven to be more congenial to professionals and those with college degrees, which are seen as the road to “advancement and as the basis for social esteem”, and hostile to those who have lost faith in the promise of upward mobility, where progressives assume that “mobility can compensate for inequality” and the maxim of hard work brings financial rewards. Sandel calls for a revisiting of a “central premise of contemporary liberalism.” He suggests that the moral and cultural grievances of the middle class and working class have been flattened into economic grievances. He says it is time to examine concepts of humiliation, shame and self-esteem and to understand what it means that ordinary people feel disempowered. If our goal for a liberal society is tolerance, then there is a need to engage in “substantive moral argument in politics” and to “reimagine the terms of democratic public discourse.” He summarizes his argument here: “Liberal neutrality flattens questions of meaning, identity and purpose into questions of fairness. It therefore misses the anger and resentment that animate the populist revolt; it lacks the moral, rhetorical and sympathetic resources to understand the cultural estrangement, even humiliation, that many working-class and middle-class voters feel; and it ignores the meritocratic hubris of elites.” He asks us to consider the ethical implications. In our journey towards a liberal neutral concept of “fairness” in a “cosmopolitan ethic of universal human concern”, how do we respond with sympathy to the legitimate grievances of our fellow citizens in nation states whose lives have lost a sense of “meaning, identity, and purpose” and are feeling culturally estranged and even humiliated? How can we do this is societies that fear conversations about spirituality?